The Limitations of Online Learning

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The limitation of online instruction is that much of it presumes education is entirely a matter of information transfer...and forgets that humans require more than answers to questions in order to live educated (and liberated) lives. The big question we face politically with both funding of the arts and with online schooling is really one … Continue reading The Limitations of Online Learning

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What if we stopped working toward educating the person as if there was something missing from their current state? What if people are not problems to be fixed but opportunities to be unlocked? What if every student, as they are, is already complete and fully valued? This, at least, would overcome some of the racial, … Continue reading Already Complete

The Challenge of Competency

Formal education still has to wake up to the fact that a human being is more than just a walking brain - or at least figure out some way to measure academic growth besides standardized tests!

Three Kinds of Flipped Classroom

Let’s flip more than the order of learning activities...until the classroom becomes a place of discovery, a virtual laboratory for exploring any field of interest.

The Constraints Of Freedom

When you say the word freedom, people tend to think "no rules." However, in a classroom, this does not promote learning unless students have already internalized a certain set of rules or values through which they can effectively use the learning space.

A Quest for the Abolition of Man

When the ‘Tao’ becomes a product of the educational system, it no longer has the power to keep mankind from destroying himself through utter submission to natural and irrational impulses. These will be exercised by a few over all the rest in a haphazard manner that invites no judgement of good or evil because these concepts in themselves are open to being shaped by those who happen to be in power at the moment.

An Educator’s Reflection on “The Abolition of Man” by C.S. Lewis

It has already taken several readings to grasp a basic understanding of the brilliance contained within this little book (it is less than 100 pages). However, I think it well worth the time spent to understand the ideas it proposes and will probably continue to dig for what I think is the hidden solution to a balanced educational approach that can develop the individuals sense of morality without forcing them to embrace the academic anorexia that plagues the contemporary college and high school campus experience.

A (Dys)functional Approach to Education

Popular calls for education reform to produce 'functions' of creativity only provide an ironic outline of what is missing from this functional education system: the human element. Education must produce humans. Creativity is a natural expression of humanity. In order to teach someone what it means to be human, there must be some understanding of what this is or how it might look.